Faculty of Agriculture and Environmental Science

Background
The faculty was established in 2007 E.C, there were three departments (Animal Science, Plant Science, and Natural Resource Management) with a total of741. Students and academic staff of 29. Currently, the faculty runs seven departments under regular programs and just began one extension program this year. Besides, there are three affiliated BSc programs with Woreta ATVET College since 2006 E.C.
At the end of the 2011 E.C academic year, the faculty had more than 1000 students, more than 75 instructors, 6 technical assistants, and 3 administrative staff. The staff on duty isall lecturers and Assistant professors and there are 26 PhD candidates who are studying in and out of the country. The faculty has research-oriented and experienced large staff members. As a result, different researches and community services, in different agro ecological areas are being undertaken. Starting from the last five years up to now the faculty has tried its best and has achieved many positive impacts in research, community services and teaching-learning. Some of the major activity areas are: malt barley and potato seed introduction and multiplication, Sheep breed improvement, physical and biological gully treatment, camelina, oilseed introduction for local farmers, production of different cereal and vegetable crops in Smada, Ageregentsites and supporting youth, women and elders in and around D/Tabor Town, researches and community services on wheat, forest and agro-forestry, common bean, millet, potato, fertilizer rate study, chicken, irrigation, rice, forage, value chains, FTCs, animal disease vaccination, haricot bean, maize, honey production, dairy, apple are some of them. Besides, the faculty has been working jointly with local and international organizations such as ISSD,KDP, WORLD VISION, Agro-Big etc.
The faculty has been trying to incorporate different courses and curricular changes were done to improve the quality of education. Among those were the inclusion of biosphere reserves as a content, Nutrition-Sensitive Agriculture as a course to all agriculture students, and inclusion of a module on Community Based Education (CBE) after experience was taken from the college of health science and Jimma University

Vision:
To enhance reputation in teaching, research and community service which is recognized for its innovation, excellence and discovery, and attracts the best students and staff in the country. The faculty also aspires to be a center of excellence in teaching, research and community engagement in Agriculture in Ethiopia and beyond through efficient utilization of available resources. The faculty is striving to produce highly qualified professionals in agriculture and environmental sciences through rigorous theoretical and practical education and to develop and disseminate problem solving agricultural production technologies through conducting demand-driven research in Ethiopia.
Mission:
The faculty desires to generate self-confidence, competent, problem solving, and innovative graduates who basically committed to the advancement of society.
Research thematic areas
• Improving crops productivity, Food security and livelihood of the society
• Forest carbon storage, forest disease, forest ecosystem service valuation, Traditional Agro forestry practices.
• Improving Post Harvest Life of Horticultural Crops
• Establishment of Home gardening and Improving Nutritional Eating Habit of the Community
• Variety adaptation trial on temperate fruits and temperate vegetables
• Establishment of Apple Fruit Seedling Multiplication Nursery and Apple Fruit Production
• Effects of Processing Fruits and Vegetable products on the yield and yield components
• Effects of intercropping horticultural crops with other spices
• Diseases of animals with emphasis on livestock
• Diseases of poultry, fish and wildlife
• Disease of zoonoses and food safety
• Evaluation of veterinary therapeutics, diagnostics, and biological
• Ethno veterinary medicine and Biosciences
• Sheep production, breed improvement, and related issues
• Dairy and beef cattle production and related issues
• Poultry production, breed improvement, and related issues
• Apiculture
• Animal feed assessment, development and evaluation
• Nutrition sensitive Agriculture
• Improving land resources management, soil and water management, food security, and livelihood of the society.

Community service thematic areas
• Capacity building of the farmers of seed-producing cooperatives and DAs through training about crops production, postharvest handling, and marketing;
• Gully treatment, Training on acacia declares, and attempts to establish Arboretum in the University compound. With this contribution, remarkable results were documented.
• Producing and/or distribution of improved seeds of different crop varieties to the farming communities in collaboration with seed-producing cooperatives and unions.
• Capacity building of the farmers of natural resources management and watershed development, and DAs through training about soil and water conservation, compost preparation, agroforestry systems, irrigation, soil amendment, etc.

No Name Position Phone Email
1 Mequanint Gashaw Dean 0918095071

mgashaw933@gmail.com

2 Firnus Adugna EDC 0963710020 firnusadugna@gmail.com
3 AberahamTeshager Department head of NaRM 0920773763 abrtesh@gmail.com
4 Kassahun Amare Department head of plsc 0925697969 kassahuna2010@gmail.com
5 Welelaw Edmew Department head of  Animal science 0918058600 welelawedmew@gmail.com
6 Mulukenyayeh Department head of  horticulture 0932854928 Muluya1216@gmail.com
7 GedefawKindu Department head of  agri. economics +251918643055 gedefawkindu2013@gmail.com
9 Zabshwork Alebachew  Department head of vetr, science 0913605682 lezabish@yahoo.com
10 Berhanu Debella Department head of forestry 0953642832 beranisi@gmail.com

 

Departments Name  Specialization Qualification Position Email/

Phone Number

Horticulture MominaAragawu Horticulture M.Sc. Lecture kirkime@gmail.com

+251910211577

MulukenYayeh Horticulture M.Sc. Lecture muluya1216@gmail.com

+251932854928

ShegeGetu Horticulture M.Sc. Lecture Sgetu2013@gmail.com

+251938885769

DessieFissha Horticulture M.Sc. Lecture desfisseha@gmail.com

+251918201037

Eden Melaku Horticulture M.Sc. Lecture Edenmelaku85@gmail.com

+251985034560

Forestry BerhanuDebela Production forestry M.Sc. Ass. professor beranisi@gmail.com

+251953642832

MelkieAchenef Land resource management M.Sc. Lecture melkie@gmail.com

+251923418940

Meleseworku Botany M.Sc. Lecture melese1980@gmail.com

+251913986518

YibeltalTigabu Mountain forestry M.Sc. Lecture yibeltaltigabu@ymail.com

+251920793634

EtsegenetEmiru Forest utilization & Management M.Sc. Lecture etsegi2008emiru@gmail.com

+251924236932

Veterinary Science Dr. ZabishworkAlebachew MPH with specialty in Veterinary Public Health M.Sc Assistance Professor lezabish@yahoo.com

+251913605682

Dr. BizunehTsehaneh Veterinary Microbiology M.Sc Assistance Professor mbalew@gmail.com

+251912283208

Dr. BalemualAbebaw Veterinary Clinical Medicine M.Sc Assistance Professor Balemual.abebaw@gmail.com

+251918150354

Dr. AschalewShitu Veterinary Parasitological M.Sc Assistance Professor shituaschalew@gmail.com

+251918519218

Plant Science AsmamawKassahun Plant Pathology MSc Ass. professor asmamawk7@gmail.com

0911065399

KassahunAmare Plant Breeding MSc Lecture kassahuna2010@gmail.com

0925697969

TiringoYilak Plant Breeding MSc Lecture tiringoy4@gmail.com

0932787921

FirnusAdugna Plant Breeding MSc Lecture firnusadugna@gmail.com

0963710020

GetanehAbebe Agronomy MSc Lecture gechasma@gmail.com

0912965784

BirhanGetie Agronomy MSc Lecture berhangetie72@gmail.com

0920253003

GetachewChanie Agronomy MSc Lecture gecho5257@gmail.com

0918491027

HulluagerAbebe Agronomy MSc Lecture hulluager.abebe@gmail.com

0904928005

Dereje Belay Crop Protection MSc Lecture dereb2005@gmail.com

0932573666

SisayGezu Plant Biotechnology MSc Lecture sisaygez21@gmail.com

0931299833

BirhanuBayih Plant Breeding MSc Lecture birhanub6@gmail.com

0911043091

GirmaAragaw Plant Pathology MSc Lecture ggm2003@gmail.com

0913964588

YehizbalemAzmeraw Plant Pathology MSc Lecture yehizbalem2002@gmail.com 0912858209
GetnetYitayih Plant Pathology MSc Lecture getnety19@gmail.com

0910198205

TesfayeMolla Agronomy MSc Lecture tesfayemolla67@yahoo.com

0945545037

SisayTefera Agronomy MSc Lecture Sisayt97@gmail.com

0918092636

AbebeZeleke Agronomy MSc Lecture az.abebe49@gmail.com

0924240472

AschaluDilnessa Graduate assistant II BSc Lecture dilnesaaschalu@gmail.com

0945550218

MitikuBitew Technical Assistant BSc Lecture mitikubitew9@gmail.com

0904562992

AdisuMandefro Technical Assistant BSc Lecture addisumandefro46@gmail.com 0968363246
Agricultural Economics SimachewDubalZewdie Agricultural Economics Msc Lecture smaemd@gmail.com

+251918281194

LamesginTebejeWorkie Agricultural and Applied Economics Msc Lecture lamesgintebeje2@gmail.com

+251910550649

GedefawKinduWubet Agribusiness and Value Chain Management Msc Lecture gedefawkindu2013@gmail.com  +251918643055
AntehunegnBelachew Agricultural and Applied Economics Msc Lecture bantehunegn@yahoo.com

+251926275665

MengistuNegussieAmare Agribusiness and Value Chain Management Msc Lecture mengistunegussie1315@gmail.com +251932823254
WalelignYalew Agricultural Economics Msc Lecture walelgnyalew@gmail.com

+251945265251

YemiamrewZayed Rural Development Management Msc Lecture zyemiamrew@gmail.com

+251918719043

YalemworkAmareLulseged Agricultural Economics Msc Lecture yalmworkg32@gmail.com

+251923535353

Animal science AbiyShenkute Animal Genetics and Breeding MSc Lecture abiysh@yahoo.com

+25937682618

HirutKetemaw Animal Scence MSc Lecture +25938287286
EndalewWalelign Animal Production MSc Lecture indexwalelign@gmail.com  +25910650114
Lemma Gulilat Animal Nutrition MSc Assi. professor lemmagulilat2009@gmail.com

+25910557693

MekuanintBikis Animal Scence MSc Lecture
MekuanintGashaw Animal Production Health MSc Ass. professor mgashaw933@gmail.com

+25918095071

MelakuMinale Animal Production MSc Assistant professor mmeellaakkuu@gmail.com

+25920122531

MeleseDejen Animal Nutrition MSc Lecture melese.d@gmail.com

+259460997

RedietMammo Animal Genetics and Breeding MSc Lecture redi21kebe@gmail.com

+25927704901

WelelawEdmew Animal Production MSc Lecture welelawedmew@gmail.com

+25918058600

YitayihAyana Animal Nutrition and Feed Processing Msc Lecture yitayihayana@gmail.com

+25918165657

BirhanuYeserah Animal Production and Technology MSc Lecture biryeyes@gmail.com
AlubelAlemu Animal Genetics and Breeding Msc. Lecture alubelalemu@gmail.com

+251921529727

Natural Resource Management AbebeShenkutManazie Plant Science MSc Lecture abshut2009@gmail.com
AbirhamTeshagerEmiru Natural Resource Management MSc Lecture abrtesh@gmail.com
DesalewMeseretMoges Geography & Environmental Education MSc Lecture mdessalew@gmail.com
EyobTilahunAbera Natural Resource Management MSc Lecture eyobatila@gmail.com
G/kidanWorkuTefera Geography & Environmental Studies MSc Lecture kidanw1@gmail.com
GirumGetachewDemeke Soil Resource & Watershed Management MSc Ass. professor girum21g@gmail.com

giruget@dtu.edu.et

GizachewAyalewTiruneh Plant Science MSc Lecture gizachewayalew75@yahoo.com
HabtamuAgonafirTessema Biology MSc Lecture habtamutesema9@gmail.com
HailuMinaleWassie Biology (Ecological And Environmental Science) MSc Lecture hailu.menale@gmail.com
MaryeBeleteAlemayehu Geography & Environmental Education MSc Lecture abdubelete@gmail.com
MaryeSetegnAstewale Natural Resource Management BSc Lecture maryeset09@gmail.com
MelakuAleneReta Natural Resource Management MSc Lecture m.alenea@yahoo.com
MengistAsratieWubante Information Technology BSc Lecture   –
MogesKinduAyehu Information Technology Level IV Lecture  –
MulatuKassaGedamu Irrigation Agronomy MSc Ass. professor mulugetakassa004@gmail.com
MulusewAberaMengistu Information Technology Level IV Lecture
TegistAleneTesera Natural Resource Management MSc Lecture tgalene2008@gmail.com
TsegayeGemechuLegesse Meteorology Science MSc Lecture tsegayeccd@gmail.com
WalelignKassieEndalew Water Resource And Irrigation Management MSc Lecture walelignkassie@gmail.com
WorkinehEjiguMesfin Geography And Environmental Studies MSc Lecture workinehejigu@gmail.com
WorkineshAsradewBerhanu Natural Resource Management Msc. Lecture workineshasradew@gmail.com

 


 Forestry department

The forestry department is a young department in the faculty of agriculture and environmental sciences and was established in 2009 E.C with the main aim of supplying qualified graduates in the field of forestry to various institutions. The department began the teaching and learning process having 46 students (F=26 and M=20). So far the department graduated 39 students (M= 17 and F=22) with B.Sc in forestry in 2011 E.C.

Currently, the department has six lecturers all holding M.Sc degree with different qualifications (Table 2) and is running the teaching and learning process having two batches: a total of 80 students.

Profile

Table 1 Students profile (2012 E.C)

No. Class year Male Female Sub Total
1 II 29 5 34
2 III 32 14 46
Total 61 19 80

Research Thematic areas

The research focus area of the department is forestry-related such as forest carbon storage, forest disease, forest ecosystem service valuation, Traditional Agroforestry practices, etc. With this regard, the staff has been actively participating in doing various research activities in the afro mentioned areas.

Community services

Staff of the department are also engaged in doing community services. Community services so far done by the department staff are Gully treatment, Training on acacia decurrens, and attempts made to establish Arboretum in the University compound. With this contribution, remarkable results were documented.

Curriculum

Introduction

The major critical challenge facing the agricultural economic sector and thereby the sustainable development endeavors in many parts of Ethiopia is the depletion of natural resources. Population growth and its associated demands for environmental goods are increasingly threatening the sustainable management and use of natural resources. Ethiopia relies on its diverse biological resources mainly on forests for its socio-economic development. However, these resources are now under severe pressure. As a result, land degradation in the form of soil erosion and loss of soil fertility is becoming a typical phenomenon in many areas of Ethiopia. Available data indicate that out of the 60 million ha of agriculturally productive land, about 27 million ha are significantly eroded, 14 million ha is seriously eroded, and over 2 million ha beyond reclamation.

To achieve the envisaged goal of economic development in Ethiopia, the primary task is to reduce poverty. This can only be achieved through economic growth which, in turn depends on the growth of the agricultural sector. Growth in the agricultural sector is also closely related to how land and other natural resources, particularly the forests are used and managed. Thus, the reversal of environmental degradation is a critical issue to the overall economic development of the country.

 

The issue of food security can only be realized through the management of remnant natural forests, encouraging for afforestation, integration of tree component to the farming system as well as in any open space that is not used for production purposes, so that minimize deforestation and increase the supply of forest products. Forestry activities are found to be a practical solution for meeting the demand for tree products and environmentally sound practice.

Forestry is an activity that peoples establish, manage, and harvest forests and forest products so as to satisfy their need for goods and services. Forests are directly and indirectly related to the life of many of the Ethiopians population. Forests provide both wood and non-wood products to the people.

Almost all the rural community (85%) of the total population of the country depends on biomass energy for cooking and heating their homes. The construction of cultural houses in many parts of the country require split wood, poles and posts, bamboo, green climbers, and other forest resources.

The country is also earning some amount of foreign currency from the production of non-timber forest products like gum, incense and resin, spices, and bamboo. The local community is also highly benefited from the harvesting of non-timber forest products. The role of forests in providing soil and water conservations as well as protection of wildlife and other biodiversity is tremendous.

This can be attained if and only if a large number of well trained and qualified human resources are involved in all processes of technology generation, dissemination, and development. Because of the growing demand for forests and forest resources on one hand and the continuing degradation of forest resources on the other hand required the training of skilled manpower in higher learning institutions.


Department of plant science

 Vision:

The department aspires to be a competent and candidate department that can be chosen by students in teaching-learning and research and community service

Mission:

The department aspires

  • to generate competently, problem-solving, skilled, and innovative graduates for the agriculture sector of the country
  • to carry out problem-solving research activities that can contribute to increasing crop production and productivity by adapting improved crop varieties, technologies and  management practices
  • to serve the community with problem solving activities that can increase the productivity of the farmers through improved seed distribution, crop protection and demonstration of improved agronomic practices.

Program Objectives

The ultimate aim of the program is to improve crop production and productivity and ensure sustainable use of natural resources in the country, thereby contributing to the improvement of the livelihood of the nation. Such a program seeks to produce competent professionals who are equipped with both academic and practical knowledge and skills in managing all phases of the crop production and management; and conducting various research and extension activities which can contribute to the development of the country and ensuring food security and self- sufficiency.

Basic information  

Despite of its high potential of crop production, the country is facing the problems of food shortages  and  cash  crops  and  hence  has  not  been  able  to  achieve  food  security  and  self- sufficiency to feed its ever increasing population, and to obtain sufficient foreign exchange to purchase agricultural and industrial inputs. Crop yields have remained extremely low, although research results show that there is tremendous potential to increase production and productivity. Low agricultural productivity can be attributed to limited access, by smallholder farmers, to agricultural inputs,  improved production technologies, irrigation and agricultural markets, and more importantly, to poor land management practices that have led to severe land degradation. Current crop production and productivity of the country in general can be reversed and increased through the use of improved production technologies, reduction of pre- and post-harvest crop losses, and efficient use and proper management of natural resources. This can be attained if and only if a large number of well trained and qualified human resources is involved in all processes of technology generation, dissemination and development.

 The department of plant science was one of the departments opened under the faculty of Agriculture and Environmental science to alleviate aforementioned problems. It started its teaching learning activities in 2004 E.C and contributed competent graduates for the country with six rounds of graduation since 2006 E.C. Currently, the department has two batches of students i.e. 2nd year (74 students) and 3rd year (94 students) with a total of 168 students in  BSc program.  In addition, the department has one BSc program in affiliation with Woreta Agriculture Technical and Vocational Education Training Center.

Recently, the department contributed 109 graduates in 2010 E.C and 81 graduates in 2011 E.C. for the agriculture sector. Presently the department has 94 graduate candidates to be graduated in 2013 E.C.

Presently, the department has 5 female and 15 male totally 20 staffs of which 17 with MSc degree, 1 BSc degree and 2 technical assistants. Among them, 8 instructors are on study for their PhD program and 1 is for her MSc program.  The rest 9 instructors and 2 technical assistants are on duty.

Curriculum

Introduction

The agricultural sector greatly influences economic performance in Ethiopia. Ethiopia has diverse physical and social environments and a great diversity of tropical, subtropical, and temperate climates, soil and vegetation. The variability in environmental factors has an important implication on the diversity of plants in the country. The elevations provide for temperature differences for growing several kinds of crops. A wide variety of crops are found growing in various parts of the country. In the highlands, where cool temperature prevails, common temperate crops are grown. Many tropical and subtropical crops are also grown in low to mid altitudes of the country. The country is a center of origin and/or diversity for many plant species including several cultivated crops, such as coffee, sorghum, “teff”, durum wheat, finger millet, barley, “noug”, safflower, sesame, castor bean, faba bean, etc.

In the highlands of the country, where more than 75% of its population dwell, crop production is the predominant agricultural activity supplemented with livestock production.  The crop production system is smallholder dominated farming practiced under rain-fed condition, which is characterized by subsistence farming with crop and livestock husbandry typically put under the same management unit.

Current crop production and productivity of the country in general and of the Amhara Region in particular can be reversed and increased through the use of improved production technologies, reduction of pre- and post-harvest crop losses, and conservation of resource bases. This can be attained if and only if huge number of well trained and qualified human resource is involved in all processes of technology generation, dissemination, and adoption. Debre Tabor University which is situated at the midst of agrarian ANRS having about 20 million human population and contributing about 30 % of the national crop production, therefore, should start to produce enough well-trained and qualified personnel in plant sciences both in regular, extension, and summer programs.

The dry lands cover about 66.6% of the total landmass of the country. These are areas of low and poorly distributed rainfall, which adversely affects growing crops. As the human population increases, the impact of drought, land degradation, and subsequent food shortage is increasing in severity in these areas.

Despite its high potential for crop production, the country is facing the problems of food shortages and cash crops and hence has not been able to achieve food security and self-sufficiency to feed its ever-increasing population, and to obtain sufficient foreign exchange to purchase agricultural and industrial inputs. Crop yields have remained extremely low, although research results show that there is tremendous potential to increase production and productivity. Low agricultural productivity can be attributed to limited access, by smallholder farmers, to agricultural inputs,  improved production technologies, irrigation and agricultural markets, and more importantly, to poor land management practices that have led to severe land degradation. Current crop production and productivity of the country, in general, can be reversed and increased through the use of improved production technologies, reduction of pre- and post-harvest crop losses, and efficient use and proper management of natural resources. This can be attained if and only if a large number of well trained and qualified human resources are involved in all processes of technology generation, dissemination, and development.


DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE

VISION AND MISSION OF THE PROGRAM

Vision:-The vision the department is to become a full-fledged center of excellence in the field of horticulture that would put the University to be one of the top African universities in agriculture with worldwide recognition.

Mission:-The program will contribute to the development of agricultural sector and thereby ensure food security and self-sufficiency through; –

  • Teaching and research activities in the area of horticultural crop production and management
  • Generating knowledge and producing skilled manpower in the field of  horticultural
  • Offering tailor-made trainings and consultancy services for those involved in horticultural crop production, either small scale producers and commercial as well
  • Modernizing horticultural crop production sector by supplying it improved technologies i.e improved seed or planting material, propagation techniques, optimum fertilization, irrigation etc.
  • Improving the quality of living of the society by supplying surplus production by maximizing productivity.

Values

The department of Horticulture shares the values of the University listed hereunder:

  • Unity
  • Community first
  • Committed no matter what
  • Quality first
  • Equity for all
  • Value each other
  • Creativity
  • Democratic thinking

DEPARTMENT OBJECTIVE

General Objective

This general objective of the program is to produce high – level manpower equipped with adequate knowledge and skill to design and implement the activities indicated in the perspective graduate profile.

Specific Objectives

The program will have the following specific objectives in the undergraduate program of Horticultural sciences:

Provide students with basic and applied knowledge and skills of horticultural crops production & management, breeding, protection and soil fertility management principles & concepts

  • Enable the students to understand and realize problems in horticultural crop production and seek solutions through exposure to research, extension and management.
  • Provide the students with the knowledge of handling horticultural fruit plants and their products.
  • Integrate teaching-research activities with extension activities so as to extend the new improved technologies to the farmers

DEPARTMENT STAFF PROFILE and RESEARCH THEMATIC AREA

Horticulture department fulfilling all the following research and seminars

  • Seminar on a specific topic related to horticultural agronomy, horticultural breeding, protection and soil fertility management under the supervision of instructors in the department

OUR RESEARCH TEMATIC AREA

  1. Improving Post Harvest Life of Horticultural Crops
  2. Establishment of Home gardening and Improving Nutritional Eating Habit of the Community
  3. Variety adaptation trial on temperate fruits and temperate vegetables
  4. Establishment of Apple Fruit Seedling Multiplication Nursery and Apple Fruit Production
  5. Effects of Processing Fruits and Vegetable products on the yield and yield components
  6. Effects of Intercropping horticultural crops with other spices

 

PROFESSIONAL PROFILE

  • Design, execute, monitoring & evaluation of horticultural projects
  • Provide professional service and leadership in horticultural enterprises
  • Generate self-employment and establish and mange private enterprises related to their profession and related fields.
  • Involve in consultancy and advisory service in the field of horticulture.
  • Design and conduct trainings for specialized skill and knowledge in areas of horticulture in agricultural colleges, universities and training centers
  • Dedicate to live and work with the farming community.
  • Initiate and run private horticultural farms as self-employment
  • Capable to teach and train in several aspects of horticultural fields
  • Relate and integrate production of horticultural crops with other farm enterprises
  • Undertake research and feasibility studies to advise investors, different agriculture sectors

Curriculum

Name of the program me Horticulture
Total Load 180ECTS/112CREDIT HOUR
Total number of modules 18
Duration of the study 3 Years in regular program
Degree awarded Ø  English: Bachelor of Science degree in Horticulture.

Ø  Amharic: <<ባችለርዲግሪበሆርቲካልቸር>>

BACKGROUND AND JUSTIFICATION

Agriculture contributes approximately over half of the GDP, employs about 85% of the labor force, amounts for about 90% of the foreign exchange earnings, and provides livelihood to over 90% of the Ethiopian population. These all shows that agriculture predominant sector to the economy. The country has a suitable climatic and edaphic conditions for the production of various fruits, vegetables, stimulant crops, spices, coffee, medicinal plants, cut flowers, and root and tuber crops. The country’s future development strategy focuses on the efficient and effective mobilization and utilization of agricultural resources. However, the full potential of these crops has not yet been exploited.

As a result of recurrent drought in the country from time to time, Ethiopia is facing repeated malnutrition problems occasioned by unstable food crops production. Root and tuber crops yield as much as over 40 tons per hectare in a growing season. They provide food security in times of drought, famine and food shortages. Apart from improving the composition and variation in the diet, fruits and vegetables help in balancing nutrition and protecting vulnerable groups of the local population from disorders associated with low mineral and vitamins deficiency.

 

Horticulture is one of the sub-sectors of agriculture from which many developing and developed countries have been benefiting a lot, not only for food self-sufficiency but also for sustainability of their economies. Horticulture encompasses a number of crops and commodities ranging from fruits, vegetables, root and tuber crops, to cut flowers and ornamentals. Ethiopia has a suitable climatic and edaphic conditions for the production of various fruits, vegetables, stimulant crops, spices, coffee, medicinal plants, cut flowers, and root and tuber crops. However, the full potential of these crops has not yet been exploited. Root and tuber crops are significant as staple substitutes to the “food basket” of Ethiopia. They can provide as much as over 40 tons per hectare in a growing season. They also provide food security in times of drought, famine and food shortages. Apart from improving the composition and variation in the diet, fruits and vegetables help in balancing nutrition and protecting vulnerable groups of the local population from disorders associated with low mineral and vitamins deficiency. Fruit and vegetables improve the composition and variation in the diet, and they also help in balancing nutrition and protecting vulnerable groups of the local population from disorders associated with low minerals and vitamin deficiencies.

Nowadays great demand for trained manpower in the field of horticulture is created due to the flourished floricultural industries in the country. Besides, horticultural graduates are also important to modernize the traditional horticultural production in subsistent agricultural system of Ethiopia. Future prospect of horticultural businesses and the consumption of the products are expected to increase significantly in the future with the increase in the level of income and standard of living. However, one of the key constraints to the growth and development of the horticulture sector in the country is lack of a well-qualified manpower in the field.

In order to tackle the problem in the horticulture industry and bring about major improvement through training and research, Ethiopia requires trained manpower in this valuable but deficient sub-sector of agriculture.Based on the existing needs, Horticulture Department of Arbaminch University was established in year 2008/9 under the College of Agricultural Sciences. The existence of a favorable educational policy, abundant national and regional resources, availability of adequate facilities, regional and national commitments and opportunities of getting qualified man power to undertake the program could be some of the conditions inviting and justifying the initiation of BSc. programs in the field of horticulture.

RATIONALE OF THE PROGRAM

The country’s future development strategy focuses on the efficient and effective mobilization and utilization of agricultural resources. As a result of recurrent drought in the country from time to time Ethiopia is facing repeated malnutrition problems occasioned by unstable food crops production. There is an increasing trend of awareness of the need to evolve a sustainable agricultural system in the country while fostering food security without endangering the fragile environment or unduly exploiting the natural resource base on which agriculture depends heavily.

The fruit and vegetable sub-sector in Ethiopia has a high potential for domestic, regional and international markets, but that substantial coordinated efforts and investments by both public and private sectors parties are required to actually realize these potentials. Studies indicated that most of Ethiopia’s fruits and vegetables are grown for local consumption. Considerable amounts of fruits and vegetables grown on small private farms in Eastern Ethiopia are exported. The export fruits include oranges, mangos, lemons, papaya, grapefruit, pineapple and banana. Ethiopia also sells some processed fruits and vegetables to Yemen, Saudi Arabia and other Middle East countries. The country also exports green beans, tomatoes, mangoes and papaya to Europe mainly to Germany, the Netherlands and Italy. According to statistical data, Ethiopia’s export of fruits and vegetables has been growing slowly in recent years. As a result, more positive results have been scored lately from the area of horticulture following the measures that were taken by those relevant authorities to properly tap the potentially rich resource. Having any rich resource and potential only would not be enough unless training, research and study is conducted to properly exploit that very huge resource. According to the preliminary surveys made by Hawassa and Jimma Universities to assess the market demand for agricultural economists, the result clearly indicated that there is shortage of these professionals in the labour market. In order to tackle the problem current horticulture development strategy of the country and development of the sector calls for the need to train more skilled professionals and experts to utilize the rich horticultural potential of the country.

The current poverty reduction effort and promotion of sustainable development in Ethiopia demand competent and committed professionals in Horticulture. In reply to this demand, the universities developed a curriculum to contribute its share to the economic development of the country. To materialize the need of the labour market it is badly needed to have modularized: task oriented, student centred and competency based curriculum. In response to this, in the academic year 2011/2012 the MoE came up with the notion of implementing a modularized and nationally harmonized curriculum by different universities. The curriculum of the undergraduate program is developed with the involvement of concerned stakeholders. As a result, the curriculum has been harmonized with the curricula of other universities in the country. Accordingly, the conventional curricula have been modified to include the students’ workload through awarding ECTS instead of credit hours.

Researches Done By the Department

  1. Tittle :-FARMERS PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION AND ADAPTATION OF ONION (Allium cepa L.)  VARIETIES, UNDER RAINFALL CONDITION IN SOUTHERN GONDAR ZONE AMHARA REGION

Objective of the Study

  • The main objective of this study is to select high yielder onion varieties under rain fed condition for south Gondar Zone and similar zone. However the specific objectives of the study are:
  1. To evaluate bulb yield and yield component of onion variety at different location.
  2. To evaluate bulb yield and yield component of onion variety based on farmers preference.
  3. To test the adaptability of improved and high yielder onion  varieties through participatory variety selection approach;
  4. To assess the effect of location and management on bulb storage and shelf life of bulbs.
  5. Tittel: – Evaluation of Different Garlic (Allium SativumL.) Varieties for Yield and Yield components and Disease Resistances at South Gonder Zone, North Western Ethiopia.

Objectives: – The main objective of this study is to select adaptable and high yielder garlic varieties under irrigation for south Gondar Zone and similar zone. However, the specific objectives of the study are:

  • To evaluate bulb yield and yield component of garlic at different garlic variety
  • To select adaptable and high yielder garlic varieties

Community Services Done By the Department

Tittles: – Demonstration of Appropriate Agronomic Practice On Yield And Yield Components Of Garlic Production At Smada Districts, In South Gondar Zone

Objectives:-

  1. To Demonstrate appropriate agronomic practices for garlic production
  2. To introduce, demonstrate and promote  the  new released varieties of garlic in addition to the existing one
  3. To break the community attitude  about garlic production and productivity-related with disease occurrence
  4. To Create awareness   production market-oriented vegetables for the community

Tittles:- Vegetable production and nutrition  by kosoye development program me 

Objectives:-

  • To create job opportunity for the society
  • To solve malnutrition problems of the society
  • To produce vegetables in small village and schools
  • To produce  vegetables in small plot of land even in containers